Moving On Up

My coach and mentor posted on social media that he had turned in his resignation at his current position. He is giving up his full time position as an anticoagulation pharmacist at the VA to become an entrepreneur full time. I am very excited for him and his journey, and I am very happy that I get to see him from the sidelines. A, you’ve been successful in your endeavor so far; I know you’ll go on to create more opportunities for yourself and for others.

When I read that post, it got me thinking about my own pharmacy journey, as well as my general life path. Am I truly happy with where I am right now? The answer is yes and no. I am very lucky to be in a job that I love. To be honest, I love my job most of the time; there are some times when I hate it. I have a job where I am challenged mentally, my schedule is normal business hours, I have great rapport with the physicians and nurses, the patients are grateful for my help and expertise, my colleagues and managers are always there whenever I need them, and the technicians I work with are extremely hardworking and loyal. Seems like every pharmacist’s dream job, right?

So why am I not truly happy where I am right now? There are so many reasons. The first reason is the direction that pharmacy is heading towards right now. There are too many players in the pharmacy game, and most of them are not even pharmacists. We are constantly fighting with the PBMs (pharmacy benefit managers; these are the companies that take care of the prescription insurance claims). Most of the medications dispensed in our pharmacies are high cost anti-cancer medications, they cost $5,000 to $20,000 per month. So of course we are fighting for reimbursement, and the right to dispense at our pharmacy, instead of forcing the patients to use their mail order specialty pharmacies. It gets REALLY hot here in Texas (we’ve already had several days in a row where the high has been over 100 degrees), and leaving medications out on the porch in this heat, or in a non climate controlled area, is just a waste of money, time, and resources (if a medication gets too hot, it can lose its efficacy). Patients then can get unexpected delays in their treatments, or their out-of-pocket costs are too high. This is especially true for Medicare patients, who are exempt from taking advantage of copay cards or other assistance from the drug manufacturers. It does break my heart to see patients unable to get their medications because they cannot afford it.

The biggest reason is that I feel like I’m not doing enough to make an impact in the world. Don’t get me wrong, I love being a pharmacist, especially in the oncology setting. I love the path that pharmacy journey has taken me. I am definitely a well rounded pharmacist, because of my experiences; I do not have a narrow field of vision when it comes to pharmacy, which is a dangerous risk with those who specialize. However, I love helping people realize their dreams or overcoming their limitations. I have helped friends and strangers overcome fears and limiting perspectives, and they’ve had their lives change for the better. But I always feel like I can do …. more. I could help more people realize their potential. I could guide more people to find what their true passion is in life. I could advise more people to take the necessary steps needed to get their dream job. More importantly, I can help MYSELF more by sharing my wisdom and talent so others can achieve their goals and dreams.

I’m hoping to follow A’s footsteps, but in my own journey. A has done incredibly well for himself, but I know that his path is not my path. My path will lead me to my own success and experiences. Nonetheless, words cannot express how grateful I am for A’s guidance in my journey.

Until then, I’ll just keep singing the “The Jeffersons” theme song in my head. For those who don’t know what I’m talking about, here is the link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L09qnRfZY-k

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